• Marketing automation is all about making your life easier. Nurturing leads used to be one-part science and one-part creativity, but whichever part you focused on, nurturing your leads to become sales-ready was never easy. We’ve partnered with Incapsula to bring you some tips on how to best choose a marketing automation solution.
  • …it demonstrates that “attackers are still ahead of enterprises, even the larger companies when it comes to covering their tracks,” Amichai Shulman, CTO of Imperva, said in email comments sent to SC Media.
  • As much as half of your site traffic may come from bots, and some are up to no good. Here are some ways to stop them.
  • Security firm Imperva presented a report about HTTP/2 security vulnerabilities at Black Hat this summer.The company reported all the vulnerabilities to vendors, and they have all been fixed, said Itsik Mantin, the company's director of security research. "The protocol itself, the way HTTP/2 is explained and specified in the standard, is OK," he said. "There is no problem there. The problem is in the implementations."
  • Consumers need to decide whether they trust the company with which they are sharing their information, said Terry Ray, chief strategist at Redwood Shores, California-based Imperva. “Once shared, regardless of the trust the consumer has in the organization with which they share it, the only measure of security for consumer data is what the organization has implemented as a data security strategy,” Ray said. “My inherent trust of my bank, whether misguided or not, is still higher than that of a phone application, which I might personally see as less interested in protecting my private data.”
  • Another day, another Yahoo! breach. This time affecting 1 BILLION accounts and completely separate from the already disclosed 2014 breach. Amichai Shulman, CTO of Imperva: “If there’s one thing we learned in 2016, it is that breaches – and this latest Yahoo! one is of the largest ever – can go undetected for years.
  • Things got a lot worse for Yahoo and its users on Wednesday after the internet pioneer admitted a data breach in 2013 has exposed customer details linked to a further one billion accounts. Imperva CTO Amichai Shulman added that the long dwell time has ensured this breach has an even bigger impact on Yahoo and its customers. “If the enterprises had promptly detected the breaches a lot of the potential damage could have been avoided.”
  • N Brown deploys Imperva Incapsula for improved website security with DDoS Protection and Web Application Firewall.
  • Amichai Shulman, CTO, Imperva: “If there is one thing we learned in 2016, it is that breaches – and this Yahoo! one is one of the largest ever – can go undetected for years. Troves of data apparently compromised as long ago as 2012 popped on the Dark Net in 2016, which likely means that at least some of this data has been circulating through the Dark Net for years.”
  • Imperva, Inc., committed to protecting business-critical data and applications in the cloud and on-premises, today announced that fashion retailer N Brown Group plc is using the Imperva Incapsula service to protect its online business.
  • A Turkish hacking crew is running a DDoS-for-Points platform where participants can earn points if they carry out DDoS attacks against a list of predetermined targets, points they can exchange later on for various online click-fraud tools. Marc Gaffan, General Manager for the Incapsula Service at Imperva: “This is not a game changer but a natural evolution of hackers learning and improving on how to monetize their assets…” Morgan Gerhart, VP at Imperva: “This is another example of how Cybercrime itself is evolving into an industry with a very sophisticated and more specialized value-chain/supply chain.
  • Web security firm Incapsula discovered the router-based botnet, which had been launching attacks for months before being discovered. Incapsula’s researchers traced the malicious traffic back to routers made by a specific manufacturer and distributed by ISPs around the world to their customers. The devices had DDoS malware programs installed on them — usually more than one.
  • Ben Herzberg, security group research manager at Imperva, the cybersecurity software vendor based in Redwood Shores, Calif., said, "This is not the first time that cybercriminals are using so called 'good causes' in order to justify their actions and, again, increase their ROI. The short answer is: It's not charity when someone's pointing a gun at you."
  • It doesn’t help that DDoS-for-hire service have made it easy for amateurs to launch such attacks. Security firm Imperva estimates that the percentage of DDoS attacks relying on these services has risen to 93 percent.
  • A gang of Turkish hackers has turned web attacks into a game by offering hackers rewards for taking down chosen pages. Marc Gaffan, general manager for the Incapsula service at Imperva, described the discovery as not only a game changer but a natural evolution of hackers learning and improving on how to monetise their assets.
  • A hacking group based in Turkey has started up its own loyalty rewards programme to encourage the perpetrators of distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks to take down its chosen targets. "This is not a game changer but a natural evolution of hackers learning and improving on how to monetize their assets,” said Marc Gaffan, general manager for the Incapsula service at Imperva.
  • A TURKISH HACKING GANG is taking an unusual approach to funding denial of service attacks, and is soliciting for, and offering hackers rewards for taking down chosen pages. "This is not a game changer but a natural evolution of hackers learning and improving on how to monetize their assets,” said Marc Gaffan, general manager for the Incapsula service at Imperva.
  • Gone Phishing: A report from data security firm Imperva found phishing-as-a-service campaigns are less expensive and twice as profitable as traditional phishing attacks.
  • Research from the “New Variant of Mirai” blog post about Talk Talk routers was cited in this post about a new IoT security report from the Institute for Critical Infrastructure Technology (ICIT).
  • Attackers tap the cloud to reduce costs and increase efficiency of their phony and malicious emails, according to a new Imperva study. "We've tried to understand the motives of the attackers, which we believe are financial," says Itsik Mantin, director of security research at Imperva. So as long as they remain profitable, most Web servers are easily exploited.
  • Hundreds of Mirai-infected home routers across the UK are currently acting as DDoS bots. The vast majority (99 per cent) of these 2,398 Mirai-infected devices are TalkTalk routers, according to security researchers at DDoS mitigation firm Imperva Incapsula. “The botnet devices’ geolocation is very uncommon for DDoS botnets and indicates a vulnerability in a locally distributed device, which allows for such a regional botnet to appear,” Imperva Incapsula warns.
  • Security researchers at Imperva yesterday said that a number of home routers have been hijacked by a new Mirai-based botnet, with 99% of them belonging to TalkTalk customers. The attack appears to have taken advantage of a new TR-064 vulnerability, and researchers said this could be a "threat to customers of ISPs around the world".
  • Security firm Imperva has issued a warning about the Mirai botnet, claiming that the significant threat has infected as many as 2,400 TalkTalk routers and created a nice new home for itself. The firm reckons that it is a new variant of the threat, one that caused some havoc at Deutsche Telekom and has made its way to the UK. They say that recent botnet activity, coordinated via something called Anus, can be traced to infected TalkTalk routers.
  • The Mirai botnet has spread like wildfire and now infects 2,398 home routers across the UK, with 99 percent of them being TalkTalk routers. According to research by cyber security firm Imperva, the Mirai botnet was used to launch distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks, and has been responsible for taking down major services such as Amazon, Twitter, GitHub, Spotify and Reddit, as well as knocking out broadband services from Talk Talk and The Post Office offline.
  • The proliferate Mirai botnet's malicious activities continue, highlighting the significance of vulnerable and insecure devices in the creation of botnets. Security researchers have uncovered a whole host of compromised home routers, hijacked and enslaved as part of a new Mirai variant botnet. According to Imperva researchers, "over 99% of the hijacked routers belonged to TalkTalk".
  • Nearly 2,400 home routers across the UK infected with a variant of the Mirai botnet code are being used to carry out distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks, say [Imperva] researchers. “The offenders’ persistence, as well as its choice of targets, shows this to be a premeditated offensive – not the typical random burst launched from a rented DDoS-for-hire service,” said the researchers.
  • A new variant of the Mirai malware that has been wreaking havoc on IoT devices is now being used to infect home routers installed by TalkTalk in the U.K. Researchers at Imperva recently discovered routers infected with the Mirai variant were attacking a site belonging to one of Imperva’s customers. The DDoS attack involved a relatively small number of infected devices–around 2,400–and peaked at about 8,600 requests per second. This isn’t a huge attack by modern standards, but what’s unusual about it is that all of the attacking IP addresses are located in the U.K.
  • One of the latest victims is London-based TalkTalk, or, to be precise, many of its broadband customers who were issued routers that contain a vulnerability now being exploited by at least one Mirai variant. Researchers at the security firm Incapsula reported in a Dec. 7 blog post that one of its customers - an unnamed bitcoin website - was hit with a DDoS attack on Dec. 5. Incapsula said it traced the attack back to 2,398 Mirai-infected TalkTalk routers located in the United Kingdom.
  • Phishing has proved to be one of the most profitable techniques for hackers. A new report from cyber security company Imperva reveals that the availability of turnkey services is making it even more effective.
  • According to Imperva’s Hacker Intelligence Initiative (HII) Report, the low cost of launching a phishing campaign and the high projected return on investment for cyber-criminals is leading to an epidemic of offensives. “The combination of PhaaS and compromised web servers has significantly lowered the monetary, technological and time investment needed to conduct a successful phishing campaign,” said Amichai Shulman, co-founder and CTO of Imperva.
  • Prefab phishing campaigns cost less to run and are twice as profitable as traditional phishing attacks, according to a new study by security vendor Imperva. Cybercriminals are lowering the cost and increasing the effectiveness of email phishing by buying complete packages of compromised servers and all the other components necessary to run a campaign of phishing attacks. These so-called phishing-as-a-service bundles are cheaper than trying to cobble together an email campaign from scratch.
  • According to research by Imperva Incapsula, a Mirai variant was used to exploit a newly discovered TR-064 protocol vulnerability to hijack network routers. The vulnerability reportedly poses a threat to customers of numerous ISPs around the world.
  • “These attacks are not going away,” Ben Herzberg, security group research manager with cybersecurity company Imperva, told The Washington Post.
  • Imperva HII Report on Phishing as a Service is featured in the Techtonics “Today’s Tech Sightings” column.
  • Phishing is already the easiest way for hackers to steal data and it's getting even easier thanks to the rise of organised criminal groups on the dark web offering phishing-as-a-service schemes to budding cybercriminals and ever-lowering the cost of entry. The 'Phishing made easy' report from Imperva's Hacker Intelligence Initiative details how a Phishing-as-a-Service (PhaaS) store on the Russian black market offers a "complete solution for the beginner scammer" including databases of emails, templates of phishing scams, and a backend database to store stolen credentials.
  • Imperva has released its new report where Imperva's Defence Centre exposes how cyber-criminals are lowering the cost and increasing the effectiveness of phishing by leveraging compromised servers and turnkey phishing services, which are the key drivers of the overall increase in phishing attacks.
  • Dima Bekerman, security researcher at Imperva, has blogged about how easily his Amazon account was broken into. The researcher claims this is likely as a result of him using similar passwords in different accounts - “an annoying but common attack”, said Bekerman.
  • Web-security services like Sucuri, Cloudflare and Incapsula can buy administrators more time to patch their sites, by blocking known attacks.
  • In response to what it would it take to accomplish this, Amichai Shulman, CTO of security provider Imperva said, “the answer is very simple, generic and will hold true forever — it takes an organization that uses computers and hires people. “Ransomware is delivered in various forms of email messages, either containing infected files or linking to infected pages, or files. These email messages are delivered through massive phishing campaigns to millions of individuals, some of which will fall prey despite all precautions.
  • The consequences of a distributed denial of service attack generally don’t need to be spelled out for organizations; which is why there have been an increasing demand NetOps engineers with DDoS mitigation skills, especially in the last six months, according to leading DDoS mitigation services provider Incapsula. The company recently analyzed the demand for network engineers who have Distributed Denial of Service mitigation skills. What they found is that demand is on the rise globally, with China and the United States leading the way.
  • Podcast interview with Ben Herzberg on Imperva research into the Mirai botnet.
  • 1. Ransomware is a serious cyber-threat to which many people remain oblivious As I noted in an article entitled 5 Reasons Why Ransomware Attacks on Businesses Are About to Get Much Worse, half of the people interviewed for a survey conducted last year did not understand what ransomware was, and nearly a third thought of the folks who had not been already harmed by ransomware believed that it was unlikely that they would ever be harmed. And who is actually vulnerable? As Amichai Shulman, CTO of Imperva, phrased it, any organization "that uses computers and hires people."
  • We reported on some of the classic internet-of-things failures last year. For a deeper dive, cloud security firm Imperva went through the Mirai source code line by line on its blog
  • It takes a lot to surprise people who spend their time preventing DDoSes. Even the attack on DNS service provider Dyn last month "didn't shock ... by any means" Imperva's security group research manager Ben Herzberg and was "just another day at the office" to Arbor Networks' principal engineer Roland Dobbins…Nevertheless, Herzberg says "I do think 2016 was a transition year."
  • Here are some recommendations for protecting IoT devices from threats posed by botnets: For device owners: "Be careful of what you connect to the internet. Are you sure it needs to be exposed to the entire world? If not, put it behind your router, and in the settings do not do port forwarding to it, or limit its access...Change the default password that came with the device to a hard-to-guess one," said Ben Herzberg, security research manager at Imperva. Tim Matthews, Vice President of Imperva, stated: "Securing IoT devices will require both better education of consumers, and security by design on the part of manufacturers. Ideally, security companies and device manufacturers would work together to create standards for credentials and access akin to a UL compliance seal."
  • Black Friday, the annual American-inherited discount day, has come around once again. Busting in with its cut-price retail goods, so does the risk of fraud, cyber-attacks and cyber-crime. Imperva recommended, “Minimise downtime and maximise performance and availability with load balancers.
  • Joy Ma, security blogger for Imperva explains how retailers can prepare for Cyber Monday by stopping bots.
  • Mobile casino website LeoVegas is using the Imperva Incapsula service to protect its business from DDoS and other cyberattacks via the Imperva Incapsula Web Application Firewall.
  • Byline article by Deepak Patel, Director of Security Strategy at Imperva, Giving Tips on Improving Security Posture and Satisfying Auditor Expectations.
  • There is no magic behind the success of Mirai DDoS botnets that are made up of IoT devices: the software enabling them is publically available, which makes it easy for relatively inexperienced actors to create them and turn them loose on anyone. If firewalls are set to block traffic to IoT devices they protect, they should be protected from infection, say researchers at Imperva.
  • The Mirai Internet of Things (IoT) botnet has been using STOMP (Simple Text Oriented Messaging Protocol) floods to hit targets, a protocol that isn’t normally associated with distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks. Imperva security researchers decided to take a deeper dive into the use of STOMP.
  • Video interview with David Levin conducted at the Velocity Amsterdam conference.
  • Friend Finder Network Inc was hacked in October of 2016 for over 400 million accounts representing 20 years of customer data which makes it by far the largest breach we have ever seen. Amichai Shulman, founder and CTO of Imperva explains that “With all the hacks in the news and dumps of millions of user names and passwords, it’s astonishing but not surprising that people continue to use simple passwords across multiple websites, often reusing the same password for years.”
  • Facebook has been buying stolen passwords from the dark web in a bid to protect users. Amichai Shulman, founder and CTO of Imperva explains that “Paying for stolen passwords only reinforces the criminal business model and further encourages hackers to steal passwords.
  • A survey recently conducted by Imperva showed that 39% of surveyed companies had experienced security incidents involving malicious employees in the past 12 months.
  • Last week, Facebook CSO Alex Stamos told conference attendees in Lisbon that the company buys stolen passwords on the black market, and some security experts are questioning the ethics and benefits of this approach. “Paying for stolen passwords only reinforces the criminal business model and further encourages hackers to steal passwords," said Amichai Shulman, founder and CTO at Redwood Shores, Calif.-based security vendor Imperva, Inc.
  • Experts debated various aspects of password security in the aftermath of the FriendFinder Network breach, which left 400 million user accounts exposed. Amichai Shulman, CTO at Imperva, disagreed with the other experts and told SearchSecurity that forcing password resets could become onerous. "If we reset passwords every time a large breach happens, we'll cripple day-to-day operations, so I wouldn't take that drastic of a step unless I suspected a good proportion of my enterprise users were affected," Shulman said. "A better approach is to send out a message to people to consider changing their password if they have a reason to believe they're affected."
  • HEIST, a new HTTP/2 protocol exploit, can steal encrypted content from HTTPS traffic. Expert Michael Cobb explains how this attack works and how to stop it.Details of four vulnerabilities and attack vectors related to the HTTP/2 protocol are discussed in Imperva's report, "HTTP/2: In-depth analysis of the top four flaws of the next generation web protocol," two of which were already known to have existed in implementations of HTTP/1.x.
  • Security researchers have discovered a "missing link" in the Mirai botnet that may prompt a rethink in what makes up the zombie network. One view, espoused by DDoS mitigation outfit Imperva Incapsula, was that CCTV cameras made up the bulk of the zombie horde with DVRs and routers playing a supporting role.
  • In this contributed article, Ofer Gayer explains how the growing install base of network surveillance cameras combined with a lack of cybersecurity awareness on the part of some vendors have made cameras a prime target for hackers to leverage in botnet attacks like Mirai.
  • The latest data from Imperva’s “Combat Online Payment Card Attacks using Threat Intelligence” report found that the total value of online credit card transactions at risk by 2020 will be $19 billion.
  • As CDN provider Imperva Incapsula explains, the SSL handshake tacks a few extra steps onto the TCP handshake. In addition to the request and acknowledgments, the browser and server also have to agree on a method of encryption, go through a verification process, and then generate the keys that will encode and decode the information exchanged between the user and the website.
  • Imperva’s research found a way to determine if devices are vulnerable to malware like Mirai. You don’t have to install anything to use it — all you have to do is visit the scanner’s website and let it analyze the IP address your smart products use to access the internet.
  • How To Hack An Election

    November 8, 2016
    As Dan Breslaw and Igal Zeifman, experts from cyber security company Imperva, pointed out, there are a range of different online services that could become targets for such an attack. These include carpooling websites where people coordinate how to get to voting stations and mapping services which give information about the location of voting stations.
  • Imperva has launched a new scanner to allow consumers and businesses to scan devices for Mirai malware infection or vulnerabilities.
  • Imperva has launched a new scanner to allow consumers and businesses to scan devices for Mirai malware infection or vulnerabilities.
  • Imperva has launched new software that allows businesses and consumers to scan IoT devices to check if they have been infected by or are vulnerable to the Mirai malware.
  • "The Mirai botnet scanner was developed to help home users, with IoT devices on their home network, learn if they are vulnerable to Mirai malware," says Robert Hamilton, director of product marketing manager at Imperva for its Incapsula product line.Imperva's scanner checks whether one or more network devices is infected by, or vulnerable to, Mirai malware. When users instruct the tool to scan a network, it discovers the network's public IP address and checks the gateway from outside to see if any remote access ports are vulnerable to Mirai attack.
  • In the wake of a massive cyberattack Friday that used compromised Internet-connected devices like security cameras to disrupt many popular web sites, “these attacks are not going away,” said Ben Herzberg, security group research manager with cybersecurity company Imperva.
  • Mirai Scan Tool Unleashed

    November 7, 2016
    Security researchers have released a Mirai IoT botnet scanning tool. The utility – aimed at consumers and small businesses – allows users to find out if devices on their network are either infected by or vulnerable to the Mirai malware.
  • Following the news that IT systems are back up and running at Northern Lincolnshire and Goole Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust four days after its systems were shut down when a virus, which is suspected to be ransomware, was discovered, Spencer Young, RVP at Imperva commented. “Ransomware works for the same reasons DDoS works: because people do not put the appropriate defences in place and ultimately, they pay.”
  • Still, polling location websites aren't the only possible target. For instance, carpooling sites that help voters reach their polling destination could also be attacked, said Robert Hamilton, a director of product marketing with security firm Imperva. "The number one reason voters cite not going to the polls is they couldn't get a ride," he added. Many of these carpooling sites are run by small business and could be easily taken down by a DDoS attack, Hamilton said. Imperva, however, is offering free DDoS mitigation services to any carpooling and polling place websites during election day. "You just need to give us a call. It only takes half an hour to set up," he said.
  • An unprecedented cyber attack has knocked Liberia's internet offline, as hackers targeted the nation's infrastructure using the same method that shut down hundreds of the world's most popular websites at the end of last month. "The effect of these scenarios is further compounded by a lack of enthusiasm among voters, which is particularly high in this election," said Imperva. "A DDoS attack inconveniencing voters may be all that is needed to cause them to stay at home."
  • Deepak Patel, director of security strategy at Imperva, agreed and expected Operation Hyperion to have a positive effect on dark web markets. "The exponential increase in criminal activity originating from Tor networks is driving law enforcement to apply these advanced techniques," Patel told SearchSecurity. "As with any technology, there are good outcomes and bad outcomes, in this case the number of cybercriminals using Tor for nefarious activities outweighs the legitimate users. Loss of anonymity in the short term will most likely help curb cybercrime without much impact to legitimate to users."
  • North Lincolnshire and Goole NHS Foundation Trust’s IT systems appear to be back up and running several days after a warning note on its main website revealed a “virus” infection had forced a shut down. Spencer Young, regional vice president at Imperva, argued that as long as victim organizations are willing to pay up, ransomware authors will continue to adapt their tools to make such attacks more effective with minimum effort.
  • Folllowing the news that Philip Hammond has pledged to invest £1.9 billion to improve Britain’s cyber-defences, Spencer Young, RVP of EMEA at Imperva commented; “Whilst we welcome the acceptance from the UK Government that threats are increasing and that we need to more adequately equip ourselves to defend against foreign states, criminal groups and activist individuals, it is clear that we have lagged behind in a number of key areas.”
  • Understandably, there is no shortage of cyber security regulations that owners, operators and users of bulk electric power systems in North America must comply with to keep the public, employees and other stakeholders safe. In addition to NERC - the North American Electric Reliability Corporation - there is often the need to comply with multiple, sometimes overlapping, cyber-related regulations. Organizations that don't meet requirements, including the PCI Data Security Standards for the processing of credit card information and the Sarbanes-Oxley for publicly traded corporations, risk fines and punitive damages. These are in addition to the numerous non-cyber-related power generation and distribution industry regulations requiring company compliance. As such, the challenge of identifying and routinely meeting the requirements can be a hugely daunting undertaking for many organizations.
  • The multiple denial-of-service attacks that shuttered the Dyn DNS service for a few hours on Oct. 21, knocking offline a number of major internet providers and services, set a precedent that could disrupt the presidential election next week, according to a report from Imperva Incapsula.
  • Security experts say that gaming networks, such as Xbox Live and PSN, will be high on the list of potential targets for the new generation of botnet attacks. Igal Zeifman, security evangelist at Imperva said: “From an attacker’s point of view it makes perfect sense to strike during this time of year, which is when gaming services are busiest and an assault is both most notable and most likely to succeed.”
  • Security experts are warning that DDoS attacks could be used next Tuesday to suppress voter turnout for the US presidential elections. However, there are other ways to disrupt the democratic process, according to security vendor Imperva. “A DDoS attack targeting the portals would almost certainly block certain voters from casting their ballots, thereby potentially influencing the final outcome of the election,” the security vendor claimed.
  • Cyber-threats and attacks continue to increase, with the anonymous intruders breaching large and small enterprises alike. A report by Imperva states that the UK is now the second most popular target in the world for DDoS attacks.
  • Imperva voter suppression research was featured in the daily cybersecurity news briefing. Carpooling services, polling-place locators and America’s limited online voting are prime Election Day targets for simple but damaging cyberattacks, security researchers warned Tuesday. “With voters from both major parties displaying record high apathy,” wrote Dan Breslaw and Igal Zeifman of the security research firm Imperva, an inability to access these tools “could inconvenience them just enough that they decide to sit this one out.” 
  • Following the news on the government’s 1.9 billion announcement in cyber defence spending, Amichai Shulman, CTO at Imperva commented; “I personally like the tone of the announcement. It seems that the money is aimed at increasing cyber safety for the general public rather than adding protection to “critical infrastructure”.
  • Following the news on the government’s 1.9 billion announcement in cyber defence spending, Amichai Shulman, CTO at Imperva commented; “I personally like the tone of the announcement. It seems that the money is aimed at increasing cyber safety for the general public rather than adding protection to “critical infrastructure”.
  • With Halloween here, Imperva thought they’d offer up a “treat” designed to bring cyber security professionals a laugh or two. To have a bit of fun, the Imperva team decided to ask attendees at the 2016 Black Hat cyber security conference to share the most ridiculous question they’d been asked during their IT security career.
  • "Vulnerability scanners – bots that look for security issues like weak credentials – would be a boon to home users and small businesses that lack the technical skills to actively manage their own security," says Ofer Gayer, product manager at Imperva. Even so, they could violate laws and compromise personal privacy, he says. The better approach is for users to take a more proactive role in securing their IoT devices: "Though a drudgery, the consequences of inaction should be enough to compel someone to spend a few hours on the task," Gayer says.
  • Given that Friday’s disruption involved only 100,000 devices, it’s possible the hackers could have launched an even more powerful DDoS attack, said Ofer Gayer, a security researcher with Imperva, a DDoS mitigation provider. “Maybe this was just a warning shot,” he said. “Maybe [the hackers] knew it was enough and didn’t need their full arsenal.” The story includes more quotes from Ofer and Imperva research statistics.
  • Bots aren't just a Twitter problem -- they're an Internet problem. "The proportion of bots to humans on the Internet is about 50-50," said Tim Matthews, vice president of marketing at Imperva. "Any task that is repetitive or mundane or can be simply automated is a likely candidate for a bot to take over," he told TechNewsWorld, "so it's not surprising to see more and more bots being used in social media for that reason."
  • Imperva also notes that a few new Mirai-powered attacks were seen after the source code emerged online, though they were low-volume application layer HTTP floods. These used a small number of source IPs, and the security researchers suggest that they might be mere experimental first steps of new Mirai users.
  • Mirai posted its source code publicly on what is known as the dark Internet earlier this month, allowing widespread use of it for nefarious purposes. Since then, Internet experts say, nearly 500,000 devices have become infected — a figure more than double the number believed to have been compromised before that. Ofer Gayer, a security expert with a company known as Imperva, suggested to computerworld.com, “Maybe this was just a warning shot. Maybe [the hackers] knew it was enough and didn't need their full arsenal."
  • Syndicated Washington Post story that was originally published last week on the Mirai attacks and weaponizing the Internet of Things. "These attacks are not going away," said Ben Herzberg, security group research manager with cybersecurity company Imperva.
  • “These attacks are not going away,” Ben Herzberg, security group research manager with cybersecurity company Imperva, told The Washington Post. “It would be great if we could say, ‘If you want to produce a device connected to the internet, you must go through basic security checks,’ but we don’t have that right now.”
  • Following the news about Imperva Stats On Dyn DDoS Attack Size, Ofer Gayer, product manager at Imperva for the Incapsula product line commented; “there is still quite a bit of speculation swirling on the size of the DDoS attack on Dyn last Friday. We know there were 100,000 Mirai botnet nodes – which is not especially large in our experience. So, in our estimation, there are two likely causes.
  • According to analysis by the security firm Imperva, Mirai spreads by performing wide-ranging scans of internet addresses to locate under-secured IoT devices that can be remotely accessed. Once it finds these devices, Mirai is programmed to guess at usernames and passwords to try to gain access to them – a so called "brute force" attack.
  • Interestingly, Incapsula discovered that the makers of the Mirai botnet deliberately programmed the malware not to infect specific devices. These spared devices belong to the U.S. Postal Service, the Department of Defense, the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) and IP ranges belonging to Hewlett-Packard and General Electric.
  • And now Mirai is readily accessible. Here’s another scary fact: According to researchers with cyber-security software provider Imperva Inc. (IMPV), you can buy a DDoS attack on the internet for as little as $5 an hour via the online professional services marketplace Fiverr.
  • If firewalls are set to block traffic to IoT devices they protect, they should be protected from infection, say researchers at Imperva.
  • DNS firm Dyn has released more details of the massive DDoS attack that caused outages at major internet firms last Friday, claiming it was powered by just 100,000 malicious endpoints. "Effective DDoS mitigation is synonymous with accurate traffic filtering...” explained Imperva product manager, Ofer Gayer.
  • “Though I won’t predict the demise of some of our smaller competitors, I do think these sorts of attacks will separate the men from the boys,” Imperva Incapsula Vice President Tim Matthews told CyberScoop. “What’s happened here, I think, is that the barriers to entry are becoming taller in this business,” Matthews explained, “if you’re focused on providing DDoS mitigation services in the future then you’ll need to control significant bandwidth to handle these larger attacks … unlike breach detection, DDoS mitigation is really expensive; the engineering talent and infrastructure needed to do it right is costly.”
  • DDoS Attack: Update 2

    October 27, 2016
    Worryingly, Ofer Gayer, a security researcher with Imperva (a DDoS mitigation provider), has suggested that the hackers could well have even more power at their disposal, “Maybe this was just a warning shot. Maybe [the hackers] knew it was enough and didn’t need their full arsenal”.
  • Once the code was let loose online, almost anyone could have used it or tweaked it for their own purposes, said Ben Herzberg, a security research manager at cybersecurity firm Imperva.
  • In case you missed them, the UK is literally battered with denial of service (DDoS) attacks, and is actually only second in a table of most attacked nations. A company called Imperva brings this to our attention in its quarterly report about DDoS attacks.
  • “These attacks are not going away,” Ben Herzberg, security group research manager with cybersecurity company Imperva, told The Washington Post.
  • Given that Friday's disruption involved only 100,000 devices, it's possible the hackers could have launched an even more powerful DDoS attack, said Ofer Gayer, a security researcher with Imperva, a DDoS mitigation provider. "Maybe this was just a warning shot," he said. "Maybe [the hackers] knew it was enough and didn't need their full arsenal."
  • “These attacks are not going away,” said Ben Herzberg, security group research manager with cybersecurity company Imperva. Ben is quoted extensively throughout the article.
  • Building the botnet is the time-consuming part, so much so that enterprising cyber criminals will even "lease" bonnets to one another for spur-of-the-moment attacks. Researchers at security company Imperva estimate that some criminal networks are leasing botnets for as little as $38 (£31) per month.
  • Furthermore, discussions of IoT-launched DDoS attacks are not new - here is an Incapsula post from last year about one involving video cameras.
  • "[Domain name service] providers like Dyn provide one of the fundamental backbones of the internet," said Nabeel Hasan Saeed, who tracks trends in denial-of-service attacks at cybersecurity firm Imperva. He likened the service Dyn provides to that of the U.S. Postal Service, noting that by "taking down a big DNS provider like Dyn, you are fundamentally handicapping the ability of traffic to resolve to its appropriate address." "Compare the security measures of a webcam you can buy at Walmart to a multinational bank," said Saeed, who works as product marketing manager for Imperva's Incapsula security line. "People are figuring out that you don't need to target the actual bank itself, because it can be dependent on other pieces of the internet, which, if you bring those down, can have ripple effects around the internet-connected community. What [the attack] lacks for in sophistication, it makes up for in pure volume," he added.
  • You should also look to DDoS mitigation companies to protect your web presence. Companies such as Akamai, CloudFlare, and Incapsula offer affordable DDoS mitigation plans for businesses of all sizes.
  • One way to distribute a bot to many computers is via a virus, or malware, according to Incapsula, one of many providers of Internet security and DDoS defense. Such malware can operate in the background and the infected computer user isn't even aware of what's happening.
  • The distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack on Friday that disabled access to some of the Internet’s biggest websites was highly sophisticated and involved tens of millions of IP addresses across different vectors, according to Dyn. “With the significant increase in attack sizes over the past 18 months, which now often surpassing bursts of half a terabit per second, many infrastructure and SaaS providers are looking to beef up their overall capacity and DDoS mitigation measures,” stated Marc Gaffan, vice president at IT security firm Imperva for its Incapsula products.
  • Their [Imperva] cloud-based DDoS offering is called Incapsula and has been responsible for thwarting some of the biggest DDoS attacks ever recorded. The Company has over 4,800 customers that consume their broad portfolio of cybersecurity services. IMPV shares have been on a roller coaster ride lately with rumors that they may be getting acquired by a list of suitors that includes IBM, Cisco, and Raytheon.
  • "Imagine all the street signs of your city suddenly goes blank. No one knows where to go," said Marc Gaffan, general manager of Imperva Incapsula.
  • Following the news that Discord, a free VoIP service designed for gaming communities, has had its chat servers abused to host malware, Marc Gaffan and Igal Zeifman from Imperva, for the Incapsula product line, commented.
  • Hackers used devices connected by the Internet of Things (IoT) – like CCTV cameras and printers – to attack major websites last Friday. “The attack on Dyn is what is known as a Name Server DDoS attack, where attackers focus on the name servers to prevent web addresses from resolving,” said Igal Zeifman, security evangelist at Imperva for the Incapsula product line.
  • So what devices are part of such botnets? Information on the Dyn attack is still unfolding. But analysis conducted by Imperva, a security firm, on a Mirai attack in August found that the compromised devices in that attack were also mostly surveillance cameras in dozens of countries.
  • Devices compromised by Mirai have been detected in at least 164 countries, researchers from security firm Imperva reported earlier this month, with the bot programmed essentially to scan wide swaths of the internet looking for more devices with default or easily predictable passwords that it can infect.
  • For more than one-third of companies, a single hour of a DDoS attack can cost up to $20,000, according to a 2014 report by the security firm Imperva Incapsula.
  • Marc Gaffan was interviewed on-camera for this TV news segment which originally aired on San Francisco’s KGO-TV Channel 7 on Saturday, October 22 evening and repeated the following Sunday morning.
  • Weebly Websites Data Breach

    October 21, 2016
    Following the news that website creator Weebly acknowledged a data breach earlier this year that has potentially affected more than 4.4 million customers, Deepak Patel, director of security strategy for Imperva commented.
  • Internet users struggled to access websites on Friday after a cyber attack on a key piece of internet infrastructure disrupted access to sites including Twitter, the Financial Times, the New York Times, Spotify and Airbnb. How did one attack cause so many sites to go down? “DNS infrastructure is a key component of making the internet work, and large DNS providers have invested heavily in protecting their systems from such attacks,” said Marc Gaffan, vice-president at Imperva, a Silicon Valley-based cyber security company.
  • Some companies lose tens of thousands of dollars for every minute of a DDoS attack. For more than one-third of companies, a single hour of a DDoS attack can cost up to $20,000, according to a 2014 report by the security firm Imperva Incapsula.
  • The impact goes beyond the direct target to the end users who are unable to reach popular sites and also to the sites themselves, which rely on traffic to provide ad revenue, says Tim Matthews, vice president of marketing at Imperva for the IIncapsula product line. The attacker doesn’t need vast resources, given the availability of relatively inexpensive DDoS for hire services.
  • One way to distribute a bot to many computers is via a virus, or malware, according to Incapsula, one of many providers of Internet security and DDoS defense. Such malware can operate in the background and the infected computer user isn't even aware of what's happening.
  • Hackers have hit Weebly and Foursquare and millions of user accounts are believed to have been stolen. Deepak Patel, director of security strategy for Imperva, told IBTimes UK: "The ease of getting millions of stolen credentials, with the fact that users will always continue to reuse passwords simply because they are human, makes brute force attacks more effective than ever and forces application providers to take proper measures to protect their users."
  • Web design platform, Weebly, has informed customers of a data breach that happened eight months ago. Deepak Patel, director of security strategy for Imperva told SCMagazineUK.com that the ease of getting millions of stolen credentials, with the fact that users will always continue to reuse passwords simply because they are human, makes brute force attacks more effective than ever and forces application providers to take proper measures to protect their users.
  • Weebly confirms hack, while Foursquare is denying claims that millions of accounts have been stolen.
  • Presidential hopeful Donald Trump’s Twitter support was over-exaggerated due to significant bot activity on the site four times as great as that of his rival Hillary Clinton, according to new research. Imperva vice president, Tim Matthews, warned that web admins and pollsters must take more care when appraising raw traffic numbers.
  • A survey published last month by Imperva suggested that one in 50 employees could turn out to be a malicious insider. This means that even in an SME, stocked with no more than 250 employees, five people are well placed to do a lot of damage.
  • Last week Sierra Wireless warned that some of its wireless gateway devices might be vulnerable to the Mirai botnet. Tim Matthews, vice president of Marketing at Imperva: “Given that the manufacturer has issued a CERT alert, with detailed behavioral analysis of how Mirai behaves on their devices, this appears quite legitimate.
  • There is a growing number of vendors providing technology to differentiate bots from human users and good-bots from bad-bots; they put in place policies about what bots are allowed and not allowed to do.
  • The Internet of Things (IoT) has the opportunity to reinvent how we visualize the internet, but it also comes with a variety of challenges, including the threat of hackers devastating lives or destroying a business’s assets. This chaotic future may already be upon us, according to researchers at Imperva.
  • It is now feared more than ever that the presidential elections might be influenced or compromised by nation-states such as Russia. Igal Zeifman, director of marketing at Imperva Incapsula, referring to the type of attack that would take down servers and machines by overloading them with remote requests said, “consider what would happen if the attack was used to take down the voting system itself or even one of the local election agencies. The result could be catastrophic.”
  • Researchers at Imperva have uncovered evidence of several low-level distributed denial of service attacks likely perpetrated by new users testing out this suddenly accessible DDoS tool. Ben Herzberg, security group research manager with Imperva Incapsula, told SCMagazine.com in a phone interview that the Marai's author may have truncated the complete blacklist before publishing it – possibly because such information could offer a clue as to the attacker's identity.
  • Cellular gateways made by Sierra Wireless may be susceptible to the Mirai malware, the Department of Homeland Security warned on Wednesday. Analysis by the firm Imperva found that Mirai is purpose-built to infect Internet of Things devices and enlist them in distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks.
  • A recent hacking incident involving as many as one million Chinese made security cameras and digital video recorders highlights the fact that internet-connected cameras—without proper safeguarding—face the potential of being compromised. Tim Matthews, vice president of marketing for the Incapsula product line at Imperva—a company that specializes in web security and mitigating DDoS attacks—notes that last year, his company revealed major vulnerabilities in CCTV cameras as a result of not taking the proper steps to protect against threats.
  • Now that its source code has been released you can expect more attacks from Mirai, the malware behind the largest DDoS attack on record, which was powered by hijacked IoT devices. “Likely, these are signs of things to come and we expect to deal with Mirai-powered attacks in the near future,” security researchers at Imperva said in their blog post.
  • “Something in the way we treat and mandate information protection needs to be changed,” said Amichai Shulman, co-founder and chief technology officer of cybersecurity company Imperva Inc. “The fact that we have incidents like this in an organization like the NSA just highlights the bigger problem for the entire industry.”
  • If you were surprised the IT department let you [download Pokemon Go], don't be - many companies have absolutely no idea what their staff are up to it seems. Terry Ray, Imperva's chief product strategist, says: "Staff often don't think about security or know what is or isn't sensitive data.And the risks of a data breach are massively exacerbated by the cloud, even though cloud-based apps, such as Microsoft's Office 365, are proving increasingly popular because they dramatically reduce IT costs."
  • In a new blog post Imperva researchers analyse the Mirai botnet which was responsible for a huge DDoS attack against security researcher Brian Krebs in September. The blog studies the locations of the IP addresses that make up the botnet, examines the botnet’s source code in order to understand more about how it operates, studies what IP addresses Mirai is programmed to avoid and reveals new data which shows that Russian hackers may be behind the huge botnet.
  • Imperva, a company that provides protection to websites against Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks, is among the ones who have been busy investigating Mirai. According to their tally, the botnet made of Mirai-infected devices has reached a total of 164 countries.
  • The malware that powered one of the worst denial of service cyberattacks of the last few years has infected internet-connected devices all over the world, reaching as many as 177 countries, according to security researchers. Imperva, a company that provides protection to websites against DDoS attacks, is among the ones who have been busy investigating Mirai. According to their tally, the botnet made of Mirai-infected devices has reached a total of 164 countries.
  • "A woman has been arrested on suspicion of fraud in connection with a data breach at accounting software firm Sage. Most organisations still focus on securing their borders, according to Morgan Gerhart, vice-president at security firm Imperva."
  • “'The real goal is to expand the relationships with our channel partners around the globe and support our growth and the growth of our partners,” Soderlund, senior vice president of worldwide channels and alliances, said in an interview with CRN.'
  • Luring attacks are mounted by a competing dating site to lure users from the victim site to the attacker site. Most luring attacks target multiple dating services and send spam messages to a large number of users, inviting them to different dating sites, probably all controlled by the same hacker. According to Imperva, the motivation for the attacker is clear—to divert customers away from the competitor’s site and lure them to the attacker’s site.
  • Slowly but surely, the internet is becoming a hostile place. As wondrous as the internet is – with its three billion global users – increasingly, danger lurks. Armies of hackers maraud for personal data. Unknown forces invade privacy, installing hidden bugs. Nations engage in low-grade versions of cyber warfare. For many users, the risks appear remote when weighed with the benefits.
  • This feature on Botnet trends quotes Imperv's Igal Zeifman in regards to the Imperv CCTV blog and the 2014 DDoS report.
  • "Think beyond passwords: 'It's not enough to rely on password policies, which are of no use when the credentials are stolen,' said Itsik Mantin, Director of Security Research at Imperva Inc. 'Those in charge of web applications should be mindful to take specific detection measures to validate the authenticity of login to the system, treating with caution login from unexpected countries or anonymous networks, or logins from a web bot and rate limiting login attempts, in particular, those using credentials known to be stolen.'
  • Internet activity measuring duties fell to Imperva Incapsula, who harnessed the powers of their massive CDN to gain a clear picture of what was or was not going on online during each game of the Euros.
  • This article on the data breach of the Oracle MICROS payment terminals division features commentary from Imperva Director of Security Research, Itsik Mantin.
  • Russian hackers have compromised a customer support portal for Oracle's MICROS point-of-sale (POS) systems and accessed user names and passwords.
  • A new study from Imperva revealed that the basic materials that make up the entire World Wide Web, the HTTP/2 protocol, are flawed in four significant ways.
  • This podcast covers Oracle's MICROS point-of-sale systems breach (4:49) and quotes Imperva director of security research, Itsik Mantin.
  • Analysing the basics of an Advanced Persistent Threat (ATP), Imperva Incapsula breaks down a successful attack into three stages.
  • Tech-Savvy Fraud

    August 9, 2016
    A 2016 cyber-threat defence report by Cyberedge, sponsored by Imperva, demonstrated that no cyber-security training will overpower human curiosity.
  • "Imperva Incapsula explains, a botnet is a network of internet connected devices, like computers, tablets and smartphones, that have been hijacked with malware which allows it to be controlled by the botnet owner from a remote location, generally without the device owner ever even knowing it."
  • An analysis of five separate manufacturers' web servers running on the new HTTP/2 protocol, cybersecurity firm Imperva found that all five were vulnerable to at least one of four high-profile denial-of-service vulnerabilities. The company announced its findings at Black Hat, where SCMagazine.com caught up with Imperva's director of security research Itsik Mantin.
  • Cyber-security specialist Imperva released its latest "Hacker Intelligence Initiative (HII) Report" this week, which highlights the four major vulnerabilities in HTTP/2 -- the new version of the HTTP protocol that serves as one of the main building blocks of the internet.
  • Imperva presented a report at Black Hat describing four attack vectors in the HTTP/2 web protocol that enabled vulnerabilities in five HTTP/2 server implementations, including Microsoft IIS, Apache, Nginx, Jetty and nghttpd.
  • "On Wednesday at Black Hat USA, cybersecurity firm Imperva released new research into a number of high-profile flaws found within the latest version of HTTP, HTTP/2, which underpins the worldwide web's underlying protocols and communication systems."
  • "The HTTP/2 standard was approved some time ago, but it is yet to be widely adopted. Before the standard can become widespread, however, there are four serious vulnerabilities that need to be addressed."
  • "Security researchers from data center security vendor Imperva today at Black Hat conference revealed details on at least four high-profile vulnerabilities in HTTP/2 – a major revision of the HTTP network protocol that the today’s web is based on."
  • The next version of the network protocol that holds up the web, HTTP/2, has four major security vulnerabilities according to cyber security leader, Imperva.
  • "Researchers at Black Hat describe finding four flaws – now fixed - in the way the major server vendors implemented HTTP/2, but warn that the year-old Web protocol remains fertile ground for hackers seeking weaknesses in the way it’s rolled out."
  • The Imperva Hacker Intelligence Initiative (HII) Report provides an in-depth analysis of the four vulnerabilities in HTTP/2, a next-generation protocol expected to address many of the shortcomings of HTTP/1.x. HTTP/2 brings along new mechanisms that increase the attack surface of web infrastructure, rendering it vulnerable to new types of attacks.
  • Jason Bourne, the latest installment of a now-five movie series, was built around a theme of cyberwarfare that wasn't all movie magic. This article takes a look at the technology depicted in the movie with analysis from leading experts.
  • In this option piece on ransomware, the author established that the wholesale collection of data and its storage presents an enormous problem for businesses as it opens the door for criminals to collect information for corporate espionage, fraudulent activity or resale.
  • Two Imperva researchers have worked closely with major Web server makers to plug four security vulnerabilities in the HTTP/2 protocol implementation that launched a year ago. This article also includes Imperva’s infographic for the report.
  • Imperva Incapsula’s annual Bot Traffic Report reported that a total percentage of 48.5 was incoming online traffic from bots, good and bad in 2015.
  • Imperva Hacker Intelligence Initiative report (HII) details the discovery of four high profile vulnerabilities in HTTP/2
  • "HTTP/2 introduces new mechanisms that effectively increase the attack surface of business critical web infrastructure, according to a study by researchers at data centre security vendor Imperva and released at the Black Hat conference on Wednesday."
  • "Security researchers at Imperva have uncovered at least four flaws in the HTTP/2 protocol, the successor to HTTP."
  • Our team of researchers at the Imperva Defense Center describe the findings in a new Hacker Intelligence Initiative (HII) Report, entitled: “Black Hat SEO: A Detailed Analysis of Illegal SEO Tactics.” The report details a long-running and still active illegal attack that has been exploiting vulnerabilities in thousands of legitimate websites to increase the SEO results for illicit or harmful websites.
  • Following the high-profile hack of the Democratic National Committee's computer system, cyber-security experts emphasize the importance of secure email correspondence.
  • Imperva has announced the general availability of the Imperva SecureSphere Deployment Kit for the new Microsoft Azure Security Center.
  • Imperva has announced the availability of Imperva ThreatRadar IP Reputation for Imperva Skyfence, a new threat intelligence offering that helps Imperva customers detect threats to enterprise data in SaaS applications from known bad actors.
  • Westwing, an online retailer, switched to Imperva’s firewall technology, the Imperva Incapsula Web Application Firewall, which gives Westwing more insight into the vulnerability of its site.
  • Companies looking to recruit network engineering professionals with experience of dealing with DDoS attacks are facing an uphill struggle, according to new research from Imperva. The firm’s survey found that while companies across the globe are recognizing the importance of hiring skilled staff to help address security concerns threatening their online presence, a scarcity of qualified personnel is making this a difficult task.
  • Imperva Incapsula’s annual Bot Traffic Report reported that a total percentage of 48.5 was incoming online traffic from bots, good and bad in 2015.
  • Global demand for network engineers with distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) mitigation skills has grown, but there aren't enough qualified people to fill the available roles. That's one of the findings from recent research carried out by security firm Imperva, which said that demand for DDoS network engineering skills has grown 47 per cent in China and 30 per cent in the US in the past year.
  • Over the last six months, global demand for network engineers who have DDoS mitigation skills has continued to grow. China is seeing the most demand for these skills, with roughly 47 percent annual growth. According to new research from Imperva, the reason for this is a scarcity of qualified personnel and a rising demand for this specific experience. Companies in the UK, US and Canada are taking longer to fill these positions, as proven by the increase in average listing days for them.
  • Companies looking to recruit network engineering professionals with experience of dealing with DDoS attacks are facing an uphill struggle, according to new research from Imperva. The firm’s survey found that whilst companies across the globe are recognizing the importance of hiring skilled staff to help address security concerns threatening their online presence, a scarcity of qualified personnel is making this a difficult task.
  • Pokémon Go has apparently been DDoSed and two separate groups are claiming responsibility. PoodleCorp and OurMine have both claimed ‘the glory' for downing services on Pokémon Go over the July 16/17 weekend. Gaming platforms are particularly sensitive to DDoS, Ofer Gayer, product manager for DDoS at Imperva told SCMagazineUK.com
  • Security experts from Imperva Incapsula and Plixer offered some explanation and consolation. Ofer Gayer, product manager for DDoS at Imperva for the Incapsula product line noted that online games such as Pokémon GO are subject to latency and availability issues and therefore are ideal targets for DDoS attacks.
  • There are numerous tools and services for cloud DDoS protection, including those from Imperva.
  • Compiled by researchers at Imperva Defense Center, the report unveils a long-running blackhat SEO campaign in which hackers are exploiting vulnerabilities in thousands of legitimate websites in order to promote the search engine ranking of their clients’ websites.
  • Sports events, teams and individuals operate in an emotive, high-profile, well-known industry. Hackers looking to cause trouble, either for a feather in their cap or for revenge for their losing team, are becoming more and more common. It is this disruption which threatens the reputation of sports teams, individuals and athletes.
  • International pure-play retailer Westwing Home & Living is now using the Imperva Incapsula Web Application Firewall (WAF) service to protect the data of more than 26 million members.
  • International pure-play retailer Westwing Home & Living has deployed a new online security solution from Imperva to protect its e-commerce websites in 14 different markets worldwide. Westwing is now using the Imperva Incapsula Web Application Firewall (WAF) service to protect the data of more than 26 million members.
  • Imperva's fourth annual Bot Traffic Report reveals that bots account for almost half of all internet traffic (49 percent). Online traffic in 2015 consisted of humans (51.5 percent), ‘good' bots (19.5 percent) and ‘bad' bots (29 percent).
  • A solution for dynamic website security is Web Application Firewalls (WAF) such as Incapsula, one of the most versatile and effective cloud-based security tools that can protect your websites against the host of attacks that threaten them.
  • The Imperva report found that in 2015, 51 percent of web traffic, up from 44 percent in 2014, is human based, but the remaining 49 percent is all from “good” and “bad” bots traveling the internet.
  • Bots are ubiquitous in cyberspace. Like them or not, you can expect to keep coming across them. A lot of them are good bots, which, as Imperva reported, are there simply to gather information.
  • Cybercriminals are finally leveraging the thousands or millions of insecure devices in the so-called Internet of Things to launch cyberattacks.
  • This article covers four enterprise [security] trends to watch for 2016
  • "DDoS its first moment, this attack burst reached above 250 Gbps. It then slowly built up over the following hours, peaking at 470 Gbps at 19:32,” explained Imperva Incapsula in a blog post"
  • Vendor Excellence Awards names Imperva for Application Security
  • "The perpetrators' multi-vector approach reached a packet-per-second peak of 110 million, although the assault was quickly mitigated by a security firm."
  • "On June 14, Imperva mitigated a 470 gigabits per second (Gbps) DDoS attack targeting a Chinese gambling company. The attack lasted for over four hours and it is without a doubt one of, if not the, largest assault on record to date."
  • "Only days ago on 14 June, Imperva’s anti-DDoS wing Incapsula recorded a maximum 470Gbps “brute of an assault” designed to bring down a Chinese gambling firm."
  • "The unnamed company was attacked by DDoS that used nine vectors in a very rare bid to bypass Incapsula's mitigation services. "The assault was significantly complex by network layer standards, relying on a mix of nine different payload types," Incapsula researchers Ofer Gayer and Igal Zeifman say."
  • A recent report shows just how dangerous that lackadaisical attitude towards safeguarding IP cameras against hackers can be.
  • With so much at stake, are you giving the Board Members the information they need to support smart security strategies?
  • Noted author and blogger Cory Doctorow reports on Imperva research "DDoS for Hire".
  • The Times supplement, Raconteur, quotes Itsik Mantin, director of security research at Imperva, on cyber attacks with enormous impact.
  • BBC News quotes Amichai Shulman, CTO at Imperva, in an article on the safety of the cloud.
  • Imperva Ransomware as a Service analysis and CryptoWall Report cited by TechRepublic.
  • Network World New Product of the Week: Imperva CounterBreach
  • SC Magazine covers Imperva's March Hacker Intelligence Initiative report and quotes Amichai Shulman, CTO at Imperva.
  • Amichai Shulman quoted by Inc.
  • International Business Times quotes Amichai Shulman, CTO at Imperva, in an article on ransomware.
  • SC Magazine features the Imperva HII CryptoWall 3.0 Report in its February 10 issue. The article discusses how Cryptowall has been a cash bonanza for criminals, failure for cops.
  • BankInfoSecurity talks to Amichai Shulman.
  • The Register reports on Imperva's analysis of Bitcoin wallets linked to malware-wielding extortists.
  • BBC News reports on a destributed denial of service (DDoS) attack which took Ireland's National Lottery website offline.